Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Reading With Your Spouse...

Would you believe that my PhD husband doesn't like to read? He thinks it's because he was forced to read as a child and never enjoyed it. However, he is willing to read with another person, such as his good wife.

With the in-laws headed back to their home in Minnesota. We returned to our reading of The Underground History of American Education by J T Gatto. You can start reading this interesting book here. It's fun to be in bed reading and the kids coming to listen if they wanted.
While finishing the 6th chapter at section 83 entitled "Death Dies" we read this statement.
"By the early twentieth century, a solid majority of all children's books focus on the individual child free from the web of family and community"
We stopped and listed what we could recall of the books we have read with the children that fit this category. Here they are: Harry Potter, Narnia, Series of Unfortunate Events, Ender's Game, Boxcar Children, and Magic Tree House. Oh and Goose Girl, Book of a Thousand Days,...

So what books have we read that include family? Let's see off the top of my head I'd say Little Britches series, Laddie, (Freckles, The Keeper of the Bees, and The Harvester are novels where the main character has lost his family and longs to create family ties. Does that count?)
Wow, this is harder or I'm just tired. O.K. there's Heidie, Mother, Rebbecca of Sunny Brook Farm?,(my kids are helping me with this now) Little Women. Little House Series, Book of Mormon, Bible,...

I'm just back from weeding, and now must scoot to the library . Our books are due today!

3 comments:

Mac said...

Interesting, but I have to defend C.S. Lewis; I think Narnia should be off that list....as you'll recall the father is off fighting the war and the government ordered all children to the countryside to avoid the bombings in London & other cities during the German Blitz. The kids, torn from their families invent?? Narnia as a way to overlay their fears and faith onto the very real good and evil battle their parents were fighting. Indeed, I would argue that the kids are honoring their parents by choosing the side of righteousness when forced to be apart from them. I'll agree with you on the other ones....with the caveat that children's literature is also a modern construct; older stories now considered children's lit were also intended for mature audiences. Also, this same separation you speak of exists in the modern novel...the detached anti-heroe....it speaks to far larger psychological anxieties brought on by technology and industrial urbanism than we might think. Who was the last blockbuster film family man?

Mac said...

Mickelle and I tried to think and the last "Family man" in a Blockbuster was....The Incredibles. Funny...before that all we can think of is John Travolta in Face/Off.

Nickie said...

I Mac. I hope you are all getting enough sleep with that new little guy in your family. i can say how fun now that I'm getting adequate sleep.

I left a response at my blog. I do wonder if there is any connection with what I said at the end. I don't know if I will find an answer but I will learn to keep my eyes open as I have so much to learn and understand.

Thanks for keeping in touch.